Friday, May 28, 2010

Alas, You Once-Beautiful Water

*Yep, it's Friday, which means something's on my mind and it can't wait to get off...

A few days ago I posted a piece called "Beautiful Water," ostensibly about a woman but subliminally about the oceans. And, quite honestly, it is definitely about both. Water and woman are wondrously beautiful.

There is irony in the piece, however. I was rather drunk when I wrote it (and can't recall the exact day of its writing... certainly a few days before it posted) and while I was well-aware of this disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, I am forced to admit that it was only marginally on my mind as the piece was being composed. I did recognize its potential resonance, however, and am finding it increasingly difficult to remain calm (in a manner of speaking) regarding the subject matter of "Beautiful Water."

Within the past few hours (of this writing) I watched a video of Jacques Cousteau's grandson, Philippe Cousteau, Jr., examining how both the oil exploding into the Gulf of Mexico and the oil dispersant (known as Corexit) being sprayed by BP are affecting the ecosystem. It made me sick to my stomach. Horrendously so.

Within the past few minutes (just prior to starting this writing) I read a quote from Barack Obama in which he states, "This notion that somehow the federal government is sitting on the sidelines and for the last three or four or five weeks we've just been letting BP make a whole bunch of decisions is simply not true," among a plethora of similar statements.

To that, I say, bullshit. As I write this, it has been 36 days since the oil drill broke. 36 motherfucking days. Patriotic sentiment or no, this is the United States of America, a wealthy country (no China jokes, please) that is the home to some of the best - if not the best - engineers in the world. This oil problem is one that is to be solved by engineers... engineers who should've had a solution in 36 motherfucking hours, not days.

Anybody remember winning World War II? Getting to the moon? Sending satellites and probes to other planets and out of our Solar System? Reaching the bottom of the Marianas Trench (a nod to the Swiss engineers, Italian builders, and American divers)?

And this is why I don't believe Obama. Engineers (be they BP's, the US Navy's, NASA's, the Sierra Club's, Jiffy Lube's, who-the-fuck-ever's) could have solved this problem weeks ago had there been more pro-action by the United States government.

To his credit, Obama is publicly assuming responsibility ("My job is to get this fixed. And in case anybody wonders -- in any of your reporting, in case you're wondering who's responsible, I take responsibility. It is my job to make sure that everything is done to shut this down."), but he's also being superfluously childish in reminding everyone where the blame should go.

We get it. BP is to blame. There is no doubt in this and your saber-rattling, Mr. President, isn't convincing anyone that you actually give a shit.

The blame is obvious and we don't need your mouth to remind us of it. Just shut up and fix the problem. Punishment can come after we save the Gulf. Or, at least, save what's left of her.

10 comments:

  1. amen...
    i'd give you a chorus of halleluahs but that may be over the top...
    lol.

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  2. The blame is in your motherfucking gas tank! Own it.

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  3. I agree with both Brian and Yodood. In fact, I have a feeling I'd agree with most of the comments you'll get on this one. I'll just add one somewhat controversial -- not unusual for me, I who frequently have one foot firmly stuck in my mouth; good thing I have a mouth big enough to hold it -- thought. At least we don't have a president who thinks the big oil companies can do no harm and that the spill is somehow an act of... well, you get it.

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  4. we have treated the earth brutally in our pursuit for comfort.

    we suck everything out of the earth and sky and have no clue how to fix our gigantic blunders.

    we literally just suck.

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  5. ha ha...lot of blame to go around, but for sure, just fix the damn thing. And Obama taking responsibility? Pah! There are plenty of people going to lose their jobs over this, and i seriously doubt he'll be one of them.

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  6. I don't get it. You don't want government intervention in your political social and economic affairs but you expect them to tidy up other people's mess. It's an environmental disaster and I agree that 'pressure' should come to bare on BP or whoever is responsible but these things aren't easily fixed. We had a similar instance in the Timor Sea before Christmas and they had to drill right into the core to stem the flow with concrete, then open another vent to allow the oil to flow in a controlled manner.

    On another note, I recently read of new nano technology that could soak up the spill without chemical intervention (which is almost as bad as the spill only the oil isn't visible which seems to make everyone feel better) if only someone would back the inventor. He won a prize for the invention but hasn't got the backing to produce it commercially. I'll find the link.

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  7. Good post Jeff :)

    It's a shame it takes such a big disaster to show us how we are slowly killing our planet with our need for power. I agree with Everyday Goddess. I am a culprit- sucking the earth to run this computer at which I write.

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  8. Yeah, well I have never liked Obama. So this only adds to his charm. I have taken your advice. I am currently with a friend drinking Merlot and coffee. And I make very good coffee. We agree with you. The combination is a strangely good one. We love it. About Beautiful Water--too much woman.Ha!

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  9. I'm with Baino. Plus, I like how you figure that engineers should be able to fix this event in hours, not days, weeks, or months. Engineers like building new marvels, not cleaning up after old ones. You don't get the big bucks and acclaim for that. Lastly, saber-rattling?

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